Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

You're already doing your best to avoid pollen, but you still might need medication to ease your seasonal allergies. A few types can help.

Check with your doctor before you start taking any of these medicines, even if you don't need a prescription. That way, your doctor can make sure you're taking what you need and watch for any side effects.

Nasal Steroids

These are drugs you spray into your nose. They relieve congestion, a runny or itchy nose, sneezing, and other symptoms.

Some steroid sprays require a doctor’s prescription, but two of them, fluticasone (Flonase) and triamcinolone (Nasacort), do not. It’s best to start using them before pollen season begins and to keep taking them as long as it lasts. It may take up to a week before your symptoms get better.


These drugs work against the chemical histamine. Your body makes histamine during an allergic reaction, and it causes the symptoms that make you miserable.

Antihistamines are available in pills and nasal sprays. The pills target itching, sneezing, and runny nose. The nasal sprays work on congestion, an itchy or runny nose, and postnasal drip.

Some over-the-counter pills can fight your symptoms for longer. They include:

  • Cetirizine (Zyrtec)
  • Desloratadine (Clarinex)
  • Fexofenadine (Allegra)
  • Loratadine (Alavert, Claritin)

Others can make you feel drowsy, such as:

  • Brompheniramine (Dimetapp allergy, Nasahist B)
  • Chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton)
  • Clemastine (Tavist)
  • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)

You’ll need a prescription to get other types of antihistamines in a nasal spray, including

  • Azelastine  (Astelin)
  • Azelastine/Fluticasone (Dymista)
  • Olopatadine (Patanase)



These drugs unclog your stuffy nose. You can take some types as pills or liquids, like pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine. Others come in a nasal spray, like oxymetazoline and phenylephrine.

Don't use the decongestant nasal sprays for more than 3 days in a row, or you might get rebound congestion, which means you get congested all over again.

Remember that decongestants can also cause problems, including increased heart rate and blood pressure. If you have heart problems or high blood pressure, you shouldn’t take them. If you have a prostate problem that makes it hard to urinate, these drugs can make it worse. It’s a good idea to talk to your doctor first to see if a decongestant will work for you.

seasonal allergy map tool